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Enviroart is an exploration of the function of art more so than the aesthetics in terms of arts’ creative capability to ask specific questions about landscape and nature in its different aspects, including those of history, tradition, culture, and biology.
Included in the artworks done in true fresco, a process which David considers the most ecological way to paint, are painting surfaces that are both natural and man-made, and in this way deal with the human relationship to nature and the ecological responsibility of the artist. In the first fresco, cell-like images are painted onto the walls of a historic unrestored Medieval Moorish building in Badajoz, Spain. They call attention to the other plant and animal beings that have begun to take over the old structure, including fungus and a wasps nest. In a structure made by man but untouched for centuries, the fresco highlights the re-integration of nature into man-made objects, which is proving to be a more and more important concern as we try to improve our relationship with nature. The second fresco is painted into a natural occurring hole in the trunk of an orange tree. This idea was inspired by the traditional technique of saving and preserving trees that had been altered by fungus and insects with lime. Using the lime as a surface into which to paint a fresco of other plants and birds, this fresco communicates about both culture and nature, as certain traditional ways of interaction promoted a healthy and mutually beneficial relationship for both humans and nature.

The small sculptures come from David’s time in Land Arts of the American West in the Art and Ecology program at UNM. Picking up small natural and artificial objects throughout the camping trip in the Southwest, these objects had no apparent value, but David developed a special relationship with them and so carried them throughout the whole experience, later bringing them together to create these sculptures. Like talismans, they reflect a personal apprehension of the objects, and the materials connect David more directly with the physical space where he was and the experiences he had there.